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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 966 (some duplicates have been removed)
and "deja vu all over again: san francisco's technology needs a culture shock." >> thank you very much. president chiu. >> thank you mr. chair. i wanted to make a couple of introductory comments and thank you for taking part in this hearing and in particular i want to thank the civil grand jury report for looking at this topic. i decided to bring with me today these folders. these folders represent all of the documents i have been looking at in the last couple of years on this specific topic and in particular let me just title a couple of the reports i have on this. from 2002 from the former executive director from dits, which is the predecessor agency to the department of technology and proposal for management and resources. then go a couple years later the civil grand jury report looked at our technology with hospital "pot holes or possibilities" and a year later the city controller had a letter and said they needed to improve service and performance measures. after that our city analyst did a management audit into their practices and two years later a another analyst looking
city's administrative code that attempt to introduce positive improvements to the way technology is practiced around here. today we ask you as members of the board of supervisors if you're satisfied with the implementation of those changes you made to the role of city cio and the five year plan? are you satisfied that these changes are moving technology sufficiently forward within city government? if you are then things will stay the same around here. the office of the mayor accuses the civil grand jury of not knowing much about technology in the city. yes, we start friday scratch but we spent a year learning directly from the leaders within city government within technology units throughout the city. we had some help since two of our five member investigation team are seasoned technology professionals. we interviewed more than 40 employees and elected officials, quite a few several times. we believed there was a good deal of candor in those interviews. not as much in the responses we're sorry to say. we did a great deal and discuss what we found with people in city gov
technology protects the status quo and at thes expense of cost savings and eliminating unnecessary duplication and at the expense of inefficiencies and xengs of cooperation among units that can lead to additional improvements. today there is no apparent leadership within san francisco to make important city wide changes happen efficiently and effectively as the samples i have given show. there is no ekz organization structure that sorts out what changes to make or manages how to make them. coit and the city cio do not venture in that realm. if not them, whom? the mayor claims he -- innovation mayor or technology may or as his response to our report claims but that reflects his priority and attracting tech companies to san francisco or having his staff work on apps that are helpful. he does little to improve the technology at home within his city government. the mayor has had hand on's experience as the execute administrative officer and the head of ddw. perhaps that experience has been him in the experience of this and i hope he considers technology an integral part of city o
to the doctor and all of those things. this is the way that technology can help people) distant connect with us. 75% of our users say that we work with others to provide care and support. today, ties is three years old, and we have learned a lot about lessons with the good life. our number-one lesson is that no one should have to face thelma's, disability, or caregiving on their own. there are growing numbers -- why we did pay attention to this, constantly reaching out in creating our own networks, keeping them informed is one major reason, there are more and more of us living alone. 40% of people over 60 live alone. we are more vulnerable in terms of how we are living and we are more vulnerable because those of us are living with chronic and complex diseases. that can lead and capacity to it is a very positive thing to do. what we might think of as our desire is for the company and so on, our health is a social affair. our health is intimately tied with our connections and support. when we have a good network around us, we heal more quickly, we live longer. and when we are isolated, it impacts
with the department of technology and all of these are important. just as the chairman described for this item we were asked by the civil grand jury to give our perspective on a variety of items and you asked us to comment on dozens and dozens of items, and i would suggest for the future if possible, and as someone who sits on the committee and goes through the findings and possible to streamline some of these and hit on some of the important ones. i think it dilute what is we're trying to achieve and just one point. also as i read through the comments and report the civil grand jury made a number of findings and recommendations that they want us to agree with and i think it's fair to say that the mayor's office disagreed with the vast majority of recommendations and they asked departments to provide their perspective, and i think it's fair to say that the recommendations and findings we received from departments were really all over the map and i of thinking about this and in my mind making my thoughts whether i agree with the civil grand jury or diagree with the mayor is there an answer in be
. this one regarding the technology system is quite extensive. i want to thank the civil grand jury for putting our paces with this one and we will have some dialogue and we might have questions along the way and with that president chiu do you want to take charge here? >> sure. first of all i wanted to note it's interesting no one wanted to speak in public comment on this item. i know there have been folks focused on these questions for a long time and probably city staffers watching this hearing not sharing their shoats and i am looking and the policy makers are looking to have an open dialogue with these moatings and what i find in coit meetings everyone agrees and projects take 15 years and millions of dollars over budget to get done and i am getting frankly frustrated and tired about that, so i encourage city staffers and others who have an opinion on this and feel free to raise them in coit meetings or contact my office and i am willing to have more private conversations and i think having an open dialogue how we strengthen our operations. how we can work better with the de
at the future. we are taking a look at some of the most exciting technologies in elevators. george, tell us about destination elevators. >> this is the technology of the future. probably the biggest single investment in elevators. san francisco has embraced the technology more than any other city in the country. a big advantage with us is passengers get to their floors sooner and there is more opportunity of customization of features for individual service. four issues of security and accessibility, this is a big advantage over traditional elevators. digest i understand these are rehabilitated upgrades of existing elevators? >> yes, these are upgrades to the original elevators from 1980. all the controls and wiring has changed but the physical mechanisms are the same. >> how much energy to these use? >> with all of the things that we did hear, energy savings is about 50% from where we started. that is a significant improvement for such a major system. >> tell me how it works. >> this is the hall keypad, which controls the elevator. the system asks where you are going before you get into the
done at department of technology and tough economic times and the fact of the matter is your department has been subjected to the lion's share of budget cuts we were forced to do and not asking departments to make similar cuts in their it situation and i think that is part of the tension and why we shouldn't know been able to make headway. you allude to the fact until you get direction from the top about need of centralization you had to form partnerships and you as the head of department of technology can't tell other heads to cooperate and you have to work out and partnership. one of the things that i wished the grand jury spent more time on. this is the trend we're seeing in agencies and governments around the country. by in large most governments have a growing decentralization and we know we're not doing that for everything but there are functions that need to be decentralized and we know there are successes here in california and the state is expected to save $3 billion. denver went through a great consolidation and saving millions of dollars. what are those entities doing that
the right useful data. everyone agrees that hiring for technology needs to be improved. technology is a highly dynamic and ever changing field. no one can predict the five years of technology or what talent will be required. of your cell phone. the administrator requires a staffing plan. doesn't exist. there maybe hurdles to overcome but hiring as permanent exempt is better than the traditional civil service for technology. it reduces time to hire. it raises proakt of attracting top talent. it means hiring mistakes can be corrected easily. it's done elsewhere in the city. lawyers and our attorney departments do have at will status for the same reasons as we find with technology. isn't it worth the effort to match talent with what is needed? culture is a mighty force. it provides comfort in it's traditions. it's a safe haven u because it's tried and accepted. it's reinforced because it's troublesome to change but culture all blinds to the other ways of doing things evening if the other ways hint of doing better. it stifles and shuts down i thinking. it doesn't anticipa
down to partnerships and i think department of technology and cio and coit we spend time creating these partnerships and the consolidation project is a great one. i also want to acknowledge the airport and the emergency management center and we have a great partnership with. we have a great partnership with labor and reclassify it positions and training program whereas in the past it was done on a department by department basis so i think we're creating those partnerships for success, but i think at the end of the day it's a transitional challenge for the organization to go from thinking of itself as minicorporations as they view themselves at times in independent departments to work together as a cohesive unit. it just grew up. we started in the main frame days and monolithic and those terminals and pc revolution game and it was different overnight and everyone had a pc and the expert on how to work things so we are looking for a balance. we are bringing your own device to work and still balance that and what does it make sense to have centralized and do from a security confi
management audit evaluating department of technology's function and dt adequately communicates with other departments and alleviate their barriers to performance and i gather from other agencies this will be implemented and while the audit will be helpful it is my understanding this is under way. recommendation number four -- >> excuse me. through the chair, president chiu, i think in terms what is required for responses to the recommendations there are four categories of responses. either has been implemented, has not been implemented but will be implemented. for that we need a time frame for the implementation of the recommendation requires further analysis, that requires description of the scope and time frame not exceeding six months and lastly -- [inaudible] >> my understanding is this will be implemented but the six month time frame is appropriate if that is something we're required to do. >> okay. so for will be implemented -- yes. as long as there is a time frame. >> okay. i will use that as a default, for time period for coit and department of technology to work with this
and department of technology to work with this on the budget analyst or controller. for finding four and appoint two members without delay. from my understanding will be implemented and while the city has not moved on it for six months i expect this to be. >> >> six years i expect the city to work on this and get it done in the next six months or six weeks. next is have a plan and budget and reviewed by coit and to the mayor's office and the board of supervisors. again what is fascinating about the answers and all of the agencies are across the map. some say yes. some say no. some say it's implemented. some say it's not. it will be implemented and always a cit budget but not decisions related to that budget. recommendation number six. subject to coit approval of the i kr.d t budget and staffing plans coit and the cio must monitor adherence to these plans and i think what i will say for this should be implemented within the next six months. one of the challenges we face challenges here at the board and coit and time lines and budgets keep slipping and it's important to have monitoring
partners in the white house with waking up every single day thinking about how human technology has improved the lives of americans. you may think about... go to just picking up 20 percent of government or making more or providing efficiency in the government and doing lots of that. there are a lot more things happening across the board that were driving forward. but the important part of this is really thinking about outside of the government. how will we have an impact in the lives of americans in so many profound ways. and it is not only easy to connect the dots between how we are using technology inside government. and how we are fostering a culture of government going forward related to how young women are in the education program for science or technology and how are we creating jobs in this country and infrastructure and anything like that. so most importantly, how are we fostering innovation in this country, that america, uniquely is founded on the grounds of innovation, we are here in the city where so much that have has happened in so many profound ways. and it seems like
the administrative code to separate the position of the city cio from the department much technology. we are in the process of occupying up. >> >> mr. walton has been acting as the cio for one year now? two years now which has been a problem and i would have find if we made the acting cio, the cio and that's the mayor's opinion and i think the answer to this is requires further anal scpises require whether the two positions are needed after the new cio is hired and similarly for recommendation number ten which is to amend the administrative code to create separate position of the director of dt pointed to -- appointed by and to the city's cio and same analysis after the new cio is hired. that is in the first phase and now let's go to the second and my apologies for speaking quickly. although address although these bodies address technology on a city wide basis technology is not treated as a distinct organizational entity and i agree. i think it should be treated as a city wide and departmental function and hr function, or the controller's function. some functions need to be centrali
francisco, because so many of our technology companies have located their headquarters here in san francisco. [cheers and applause] and because they're located here, we can always ask them for a favor here and there and make sure no one is left out, because that is what we do in government. david chiu and i come from backgrounds where we do not want to leave anybody behind. we want everybody to enjoy the riches of technology. we want them to enjoy the economy in san francisco. that is why we're working so hard to make sure our central marketplace is welcoming of all these technology companies, making sure that we can work with other cities. i am very lucky to be part of the u.s. conference of mayors, and they allow me to represent san francisco as the innovative center for all the rest of the cities across the country. so we get to compare information and there. what these days i will get to talk to you while i am in washington, d.c., and you can hear what i am saying across there, so we can enjoy it -- wherever i go, you know i will be working and not fooling around. finally, we also are us
and technology within san francisco government. perhaps we have to wait for a different administration for there to be a fair hearing on ways to improve technology. perhaps you, the board of supervisors, can take up this challenge. we hope you will. there was a better ending to our title report, deja vu all over again. that is "where there is a will there is a way .". thank you. >> thank you for the time and effort put into that report. any questions right now president chiu. all right. with that i would like to ask the mayor's office to come up. cindy is here representing the mayor's team with some responses and perhaps follow up questions. >> good afternoon supervisors. i am cindy, deputy director of the marrow's budget office and here to speak to the reports. i am going to keep my response fairly brief and will answer any questions you have in the hearing. as you know ie.d t and innovation are among the mayor's top priority and shares in the task force and focusing on government efficiency, effectiveness and responsiveness through innovation and it. since he's been in office he
get the sense in reading your work over the years that you are saying technology humanizes classrooms. if i am right about that, tell me why you believe that. >> when people talk about technology or virtual anything, they alwimaginehat wsomeho achying acal -- like amazon.com versus barnes and vulcans orlike the balkan tyhe borg in star trek. we are seeing in classrooms that technology is not used to demonize thelassroom, but to go the other way. we are all sitting there physically with each other but not interacting. we are staring at the chalkboard and one person is lecturing. one student might be bored and one might be lost. the teacher is not getting a lot of feedback. we are saying let's use technology to take some of that off the teachers table so is not about eight lector anymore. it should be about interacting with your friends and the teacher and doing problem- solving. when i was in school, if a friend is having trouble with something and you whispered, you should look at it this way, you should -- you would get reprimanded. why are you talking? they should be working with ea
using current technology and we learn about the latest destination elevated technology all here in san francisco. we will also visit the machinery where all the behind- the-scenes gears control these incredible machines. we are very fortunate today to have an expert with those who is going to walk us are around elevators in san francisco. can you tell us about the history of elevators in san francisco? the measure -- >> sure. the history of elevator technology evolves with the city. first elevators were installed for moving materials in the 1860's. in the 1870's, the first passenger elevator was installed, and that allowed building heights to go up to about seven floors. starting in the 18 eighties, 1890's, the first electric elevators were installed. that allowed for buildings to go up even higher, even more than 10 floors, and those were the first elevators that became representative of what we consider modern elevators today. >> so the height of buildings is related to elevator technology. >> both of these technologies encourage architects to build taller buildings. engineering and
technology. it is a great way to make one of something, which is good. perhaps you want something that is custom just for you and you don't want something mass-produced. right now the ones you buy at home, it is qaeda militants and that sort of squeeze it out. there are other ways, there are liquid resins and powders and etc. you can go to a website and you can -- they have more expensive printers and you can get things printed in titanium. stainless steel. the quality is astounding. ge 3-d prints turbine blades for jet engines. there are some limits as to what you can do with the a 3-d printer, but not many. the question is simply how long is it going to take? it took 15 years to get from a dot matrix printer where we are now. so how long it will take for the photo-quality because i don't think it's going to be 15 years. in part because it shares the same mechanical technologies. but the interesting stuff gets into materials. right now, we can be one color and plastic. the next one, we will do two colors and plastic advocates better resolution than the maximum we will be three an
the adoption of our technology across the different leagues. we have customers on very industries, banking industry jumped in first. it is primary around the security of our platform. their need was to get confidential board material out to their board members on ipads is ideally the way to do it because it is easy and safe. the i.t. costs are low. they couldn't find a better solution out there. >> have you a function if i'm a coach i know that my running back looked at the play. i push out a play -- that is the funny thing. we think of nfl players as being of course they read all the plays. they are like any other employee. they read about half the manual. >> you said that. there are a lot of big brother capabilities that we can enable. we haven't done so until we are requested to do so and for really productive reasons. football has a few days to study what they need to study. it gets to be an extreme in other sports when they are traveling. to take information learned in one evening and by the next night how do you get the changes is a bigger problem that we saw. >> i talked to some pla
you cindy for the presentation and for the department of technology john. john, how are you? we have john from the department of technology and wanted to speak as well and welcome. >> thank you supervisors and thank you civil grand jury for your report and everyone attending. i want to take a few moments. i don't want to rehash the stuff said and commented on and you probably want a rich dialogue in question and answer period. i want to visit a few of points and give context to the conversation and like you i am fascinated by the title of the report and we should revisit a little bit and after being here for five years now where we have been and where we are coming to. in terms of deja vu let's reflect back where we were as individuals with technology or as an organization with the city. when i joined the city we didn't have a plan or a governance structure or coit and sun shet and talking about creating this structure and we were struggling how much money were we spending on it in the city? when i came here there wasn't a report? and so it has been a long and complex journey,
coming to. in terms of deja vu let's reflect back where we were as individuals with technology or as an organization with the city. when i joined the city we didn't have a plan or a governance structure or coit and sun shet and talking about creating this structure and we were struggling how much money were we spending on it in the city? when i came here there wasn't a report? and so it has been a long and complex journey, and i think it will continue in these hearings and going forward to be one of the challenges. i think we use technology on a daily basis and work and we are engaged and are we getting our money's worth and getting the service we want? and i wanted to revisit and my staff will tell you it's easy to hammer on the things not going well and i want to re-cap of the last five years and whether we're making progress in solving the problems and some of the projects are project related, operationally related and to your point president chiu and look back over the last four cio's and embedded in the organization and we need to talk about those in different conver
>> good morning, everybody. welcome to the technology summit. we are looking forward to a fantastic day. we are going to start with a demonstration of the wii system. it is an interactive gaming system that allows people to play different activities and participate in different fitness activities together. a lot of wii systems, about 40, are being deployed around the city to different senior centers and residents facilities to encourage older adults to get more involved with physical activity using technology. we're going to spend the first 30 minutes or so demonstrating the wii. not only will we demonstrate how to use it, but we will doe demonstrate adaptive devices so that it can be an inclusive activity for all adults and children. my name is dr. chris thompson from the university of san francisco. go, dons. 1855. i have not been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. w
needs of technology whto learn and to grw at to do things. and why you and i need the things you're going to hear in just a couple of minutes. i just want to take a quick moment as you get settled. you will have to stop talking because i will not talk over you. you, too. i'm going to count to ten. i usually don't have to finish to ten. when you think of technology in the world today, we can't even imagine what is going to have the month from now. think of the things that have been eaten up. we used to have payphones. they are gone. the cellphone 8 it up. the cellphone 8 of the camera industry. you don't need to buy a camera. the cellphone 8 the watch industry. i don't even wear a watch. you can go through the list. he you don't have to go to the bank anymore. take a picture of a check and make a deposit. look at all the things that we have changed. and change every day. if we can't imagine what is going to happen by christmas time. you don't even have to go to the pharmacy to say, fill this out. pick up a phone, punch in, go and get it. send your kids over. i know. simple point,
years ago, if we had sat down and talk about seniors and technology, a lot of people would have wondered why seniors would want to use computers, but that has shifted. over the next few years, as all of us move toward being seniors, we will not be wanting technology. we will be demanding it. the field is going to change, and more and more people are going to be here. so the ability to make technology accessible is there. those of us charged with doing this have a really important role. we have to be able to provide the tools for the technology in ways that the people can hear. i am happy to be your speaking with you because i think this is an incredibly important topic. this afternoon, there is a workshop on addressing multiple barriers for accessing technology, and it will be a brainstorming session where someone from my office and a couple of other people will be leading a discussion of what issues people run into and how you deal with them. i think it is a really important topic and i think it is probably one of the most important things people could be talking about now. for all of u
to create radical new energy storage technology. you know, way above what we have now. this is something very powerful, to be able to keep rovers going on the moon, in mars, things that could be useful, in your cell electric vehicles, something that just is a radical leap in new technology. but i don't want to go into a lot of detail on that. you'll hear more about nasa's efforts later. and what i'm going to do1r is ge a little more background on challenge-driven innovation. and i'm going to do that just by plaijerrizing some people because it makes it a loteasier for me. i want to look at this quote, prize is a very old -- an old idea that is surprisingly powerful in our modern society. this is by a study that by mckenzie and company, back in 2010. prize is a very old idea, very powerful in our modern society. surprisingly powerful in our modern society. mckenzie also said this, 32,000, in 2010, there were 32,000no competitions, competitions, prizes, awards. that's a big number. it could be bigger but it's a big number, for one year, 32,000 competitions happened. to continue on in myk
, again, as technology develops, if the court continues down the path of sitting there are some searches that, a detect contraband and are not searches at all, the encroachments on our privacy are going to increase ever further as technology moves on. >> i was a little puzzled as to what the florida supreme court really meant -- really wanted in the harris case. it is not just enough to say the dog has been certified, you need more performance evidence. how would that work? every time there is a case where drug evidence is used, the prosecution would have to come and and a show, what, there is some sort of test? he has gone out 100 times -- what would be the evidence that would be enough to convince a judge this dog was reliable? what's the traditional test for probable cause is the totality of the circumstances. i think the state is advocating, if a police officer gets on the stand and says this dog is trained, that should be enough. we are arguing, no, no one should look at the totality of circumstances. there cannot be a prescribed checklist that needs to be checked off. something mor
. but what we really want to do is change the dialogue about how the world thinks about technology. because we really don't think it is understood or appreciated how rapidly the entire landscape is shifting because of tech. i mean, today apple's literally announcing the next iphone. that's cool, but that's just the most obvious example of things that continue to move at astonishing speed, and there's developments literally everywhere you look. and we don't think leaders generally get that. so i'm going to give you a couple of little, quick housekeeping things that we need to know. for one thing, there is an app, te space detroit, so look that up and download it, it has all the program. it'll be in realtime all day, please use the app, detroit labs made it, it's very good. te detroit is the way to get it up on the itunes store. everything here's on the record. we're really into q&a and hearing your voice from the audience. almost every session we will have you guys up here. you don't have to just ask a question, you can make a comment, but keep it brief. we're videoing and live streaming eve
thousands of more jobs, creating an environment that will be welcoming of the new economy, technology, and innovation to reinforce what we have been saying. we are the innovation capital of the world. with your help and involvement. we would like to have the rest of the city picked up and be part of it as well. we think we can have that conversation. we will need your help. we will need you to represent the new industry. these companies are here to keep the dialogue and collaboration at a high-level going with us. it is the ongoing dialogue like the one we are reading about a new tax structure for the city that does not punish the inventiveness we want to have. i would like to open with that introduction, welcome all of you here. i think he will see and hear an exciting introduction of these new companies. they're going to raise questions we do not have the answers to yet, but i do believe we have the spirit in this city to welcome solutions with your involvement. we will have the ability to do this on line as well is in these forums. i will be part of the ongoing discussion. i want t
is that the mayor provide consistent passionate and aggressive leadership in the field of city wide technology fostering progress and garnderring agreement moon departments and cooperative and cohesive culture. the mayor has stated that has been implemented. i would like to say i hope that is implemented on in the next six months and demand accountability for budgets and deadlines and more cohesive culture and the sharing of work, so with that mr. chair you're going to do the findings and recommendations for the next one, but the only thing i would just like to say in conclusion is i know that this is a topic that touches a lot of nerves. there are a lot of folks working hard within individual departments, within department of technology and within the mayor's office to move us in a good direction and one thing i would like to state the recommendations i am recommending is no way pointing specific fingers anywhere, but i think that we have to have honest and real dialogue about what we need to do to move things forward and i have to tell you i hope this is the last time the civil grand jury
. but there is dna-like technology that can catch a medal thief red-handed. cbs 5 reporter elizabeth cook shows us how it works and asks the question, why isn't anyone using it here? >> reporter: brazen thieves crashed a truck through a fence to get to a spool of copper wire in this pg&e yard. >> we had almost 5.2 million in copper theft over the last six years. >> reporter: in vallejo, criminals strip wiring from the electrical grid. >> over the last 18 months, we've had over 97 different locations where thieves have taken the electrical cables that power our street lights. >> reporter: that's on top of 300 places where they've stolen brass components from the water system. and across the bay area, they take metal from cemeteries, storm drains and automobiles. it's a problem not foreign to europe either, where thieves have hit hard at infrastructure. but the germans and others have found the answer to a huge problem may be a tiny dot. >> we call it the least expensive, most effective anti- theft device ever created. >> reporter: an australian- based company paints microdots on metal. you magnify
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 966 (some duplicates have been removed)